Home | Archive | Random | RSS

about out of sight

A site of original and unoriginal content meant to entertain and inform. Out of Sight is edited by JJ O'Donoghue and William Hilderbrandt.

more about out of sight

If this site had to be summed up in one word and a preceding parenthetical phrase, then it would be (hopefully) entertaining. Think of it as an archive of some of the most interesting articles, videos, photography, and miscellany that JJ and William find online.

Presently the two have hopes of expanding the site to include some of their own work, and when they do just watch the hilarity ensue.

In the meantime please leave comments on posts - whether you like or dislike - and make suggestions as to what you want to see more of. For some of you it's more tits and ass, for others you prefer men with beards, and for one of you (you know who I am talking about) it's all about jam.

one more thing on out of sight

Out of sight is Will and JJ's attempt to get noticed and invited on daytime TV or any Fox TV show. Before out of sight, there was rich and creamy, a hugely popular blog for spammers who wanted to sell us penis enhancing products. They were wasting their time.

But to stick to the augmentation analogy, out of sight at its best is a brain enhancing website. That's a radical statement guys.

What you'll find on the site is a ménage à trois of humour, skepticism, intelligence and titilation. We really enjoy comments and recommendations and we hope to build up a community of followers so that we then add a subscription wall and take on the Financial Times or Playboy. Or just get jobs with them.

who is this stud william?

William lives in Paris. At the start of 2009 he left London and all his friends and his bad job to come to France, where he hardly speaks the language, to be with his girlfriend. Officially he is very happy to finally be living with her but occasionally he does get nostalgic for London.

He grew up in the US - Oklahoma (please do not hum the musical!) - and studied philosophy before going to London for a Master's in journalism. His work has not been published by the best in the industry, such as The New York Times, The Atlantic Monthly, The Economist, Mother Jones, McSweeney's, and many, many more.

Currently he is freelancing at radio and TV gigs, slowly acquiring technical skills he hopes he can eventually use to make documentary and feature films that one day will not be produced by some of the world's best film studios.

who is this wise guy jj?

Quite early on in life JJ discovered that he was a fabricator. In 2006 his mum and dad invited him to leave their home in Cork, Ireland and head for London, where he now resides, to shake up the city. He cycles hard, drinks hard and blogs harder. You get the picture.

Currently he's alive, and, like most people his age he's 29. He longs for the day Japan get's moved right next to Ireland, and that Cork wins the world series in hurling. More than anything else he want's a book deal. Failing that a decent sandwich with French mustard, mayonnaise and Ballymaloe relish in it.

27 July 09
I received this email at work Friday evening and have to say it seemed more exciting than alarming, although I am not sure what that says about myself. It says that a “collaborator” of the company I work could have the A H1N1 virus, or Swine Flu as you and I know it. This collaborator’s identity has not been revealed yet, and though I am not the least bit concerned for myself, some people suspect a lady who has two young children, and it’s the young and the eldery which have proven vulnerable to the virus.
Otherwise, the strongest hit part of Paris is Issy-les-Moulineaux, where I work. This is a suburb that’s a sort of business park for TV stations. If they ever quarantined the area I’d suggest they target the massive egos as a priority over the less harmful virus.

I received this email at work Friday evening and have to say it seemed more exciting than alarming, although I am not sure what that says about myself. It says that a “collaborator” of the company I work could have the A H1N1 virus, or Swine Flu as you and I know it. This collaborator’s identity has not been revealed yet, and though I am not the least bit concerned for myself, some people suspect a lady who has two young children, and it’s the young and the eldery which have proven vulnerable to the virus.

Otherwise, the strongest hit part of Paris is Issy-les-Moulineaux, where I work. This is a suburb that’s a sort of business park for TV stations. If they ever quarantined the area I’d suggest they target the massive egos as a priority over the less harmful virus.

Comments (View)
18 May 09

Swine flu propaganda, c. 1976. Don’t just sit there, panic! Obviously in a matter a moments the bug will spread across the country and everyone will die due to their arrogance, or their unwise ability to play down modern-era plague. As the jive-talkin’ basketballer in the video says, “Swine flu? Man, I’m too fast for that to catch me.” [via Chunnel]

Comments (View)
7 May 09

Another Swine Bug Raises Scientists’ Concerns | Wired Science

Interesting but is it more scare-mongering or fair flagging of a reasonable concern?Come on, Wired, say it ain’t so! From the article:

The disease strikes North American pigs, but American humans were assumed to be safe. Only two human cases have been reported in the United States, where farmers keep a greater distance from their livestock, and dispose of meat known to come from sick animals.

Nevertheless, the assumption of safety may be false. In a study published last year in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Gray and fellow University of Iowa epidemiologist Tara Smith described the first search for S. suis in a U.S. population. Seven out of 73 Iowa hog-farm workers tested positive for exposure, compared to just one positive test in a 67-person control group.

Smith and Gray didn’t extrapolate national exposure levels from those geographically limited findings, but it’s not unreasonable to think a comparable ratio of pig farmers are affected nationwide. The S. suismicrobe is common, able to live in the tonsils for years without causing symptoms, difficult to eradicate with antibiotics and spread by the cross-country transportation of millions of pigs every year.

“You could say that between 5 and 10 percent of workers in the U.S. might be infected,” said Marcelo Gottschalk, a University of Montreal veterinary pathologist and one of the world’s foremost S. suisresearchers. “I don’t know if it’s true, but the extrapolation is fair enough.”
Comments (View)
5 May 09
More from Evolved and Rat/i/onal. Hilarious.

More from Evolved and Rat/i/onal. Hilarious.

Comments (View)
Posted: 8:06 AM
Finally. Thank you very much Evolved and Rat/i/onal. Every media should be busying itself with quieting the panic as opposed to building it, and I work for one of the ballbag companies guilty of this.
I know that publishers need to sell papers, but at least put things in proportion. While the World Health Organization says many people are experiencing only mild symptoms and suspect the deaths resulting from Influenza A in Mexico occurred due to so yet unknown geographic factor, we could return our attention to the long forgotten bird flu that spread around Asia earlier this decade. It hasn’t disappeared, and as this Slate article points out, continues to maintain a 60% fatality rate. The good news is the virus is dman hard to catch so it doesn’t spread as quickly as the swine flu, oops, Influenza A.

Finally. Thank you very much Evolved and Rat/i/onal. Every media should be busying itself with quieting the panic as opposed to building it, and I work for one of the ballbag companies guilty of this.

I know that publishers need to sell papers, but at least put things in proportion. While the World Health Organization says many people are experiencing only mild symptoms and suspect the deaths resulting from Influenza A in Mexico occurred due to so yet unknown geographic factor, we could return our attention to the long forgotten bird flu that spread around Asia earlier this decade. It hasn’t disappeared, and as this Slate article points out, continues to maintain a 60% fatality rate. The good news is the virus is dman hard to catch so it doesn’t spread as quickly as the swine flu, oops, Influenza A.

Comments (View)
30 April 09

swine flu and the media

Ben Goldacre, a doctor in London and Guardian contributor has an excellent piece about swine flu and the media’s take on it. In the media we like to deal in hard facts - even if from time to time they are completely wrong (WMDs) - but with swine flu, everything is up in the air (literally) and so it’s a game of predictions and opinions. How many people will get ill? How many will die? Should I stock-up in Tamilflu/oranges/faces masks? Are we underreacting, overreacting? Anyway here in the UK the media have gone a bit schizo on the flu. The Daily Mail ran a front page headline earlier this week stating that “The Killer Flu Had Arrived.” In today’s paper swine flu has been relegated to page 10. Is it now a non story? Here’s Goldacre’s take:

I’m not showing off. I know I’m a D-list public intellectual, but I just think it’s interesting: because not only have the public lost all faith in the media; not only do so many people assume, now, that they are being misled; but more than that, the media themselves have lost all confidence in their own ability to give us the facts.

Comments (View)
Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh