Home | Archive | Random | RSS

about out of sight

A site of original and unoriginal content meant to entertain and inform. Out of Sight is edited by JJ O'Donoghue and William Hilderbrandt.

more about out of sight

If this site had to be summed up in one word and a preceding parenthetical phrase, then it would be (hopefully) entertaining. Think of it as an archive of some of the most interesting articles, videos, photography, and miscellany that JJ and William find online.

Presently the two have hopes of expanding the site to include some of their own work, and when they do just watch the hilarity ensue.

In the meantime please leave comments on posts - whether you like or dislike - and make suggestions as to what you want to see more of. For some of you it's more tits and ass, for others you prefer men with beards, and for one of you (you know who I am talking about) it's all about jam.

one more thing on out of sight

Out of sight is Will and JJ's attempt to get noticed and invited on daytime TV or any Fox TV show. Before out of sight, there was rich and creamy, a hugely popular blog for spammers who wanted to sell us penis enhancing products. They were wasting their time.

But to stick to the augmentation analogy, out of sight at its best is a brain enhancing website. That's a radical statement guys.

What you'll find on the site is a ménage à trois of humour, skepticism, intelligence and titilation. We really enjoy comments and recommendations and we hope to build up a community of followers so that we then add a subscription wall and take on the Financial Times or Playboy. Or just get jobs with them.

who is this stud william?

William lives in Paris. At the start of 2009 he left London and all his friends and his bad job to come to France, where he hardly speaks the language, to be with his girlfriend. Officially he is very happy to finally be living with her but occasionally he does get nostalgic for London.

He grew up in the US - Oklahoma (please do not hum the musical!) - and studied philosophy before going to London for a Master's in journalism. His work has not been published by the best in the industry, such as The New York Times, The Atlantic Monthly, The Economist, Mother Jones, McSweeney's, and many, many more.

Currently he is freelancing at radio and TV gigs, slowly acquiring technical skills he hopes he can eventually use to make documentary and feature films that one day will not be produced by some of the world's best film studios.

who is this wise guy jj?

Quite early on in life JJ discovered that he was a fabricator. In 2006 his mum and dad invited him to leave their home in Cork, Ireland and head for London, where he now resides, to shake up the city. He cycles hard, drinks hard and blogs harder. You get the picture.

Currently he's alive, and, like most people his age he's 29. He longs for the day Japan get's moved right next to Ireland, and that Cork wins the world series in hurling. More than anything else he want's a book deal. Failing that a decent sandwich with French mustard, mayonnaise and Ballymaloe relish in it.

18 August 09

Sporting events that changed the world

Foreign Policy has an excellent list of 10 sports events that were far more important than the competition itself. In at first place is the 1936 Olypics in Berlin where Hitler was hoping to show off his elite athletes and the superiorty of his regieme. However, nobody told the Fuhrer that Jesse Owen would ruin the party.

In at number two, La Guerra de futbol (aka “Soccer War”): El Salvador vs. Honduras, 1969.

Here’s a case where sports may have helped cause a war: a hard-fought match between El Salvador and Honduras in a preliminary round for the 1970 FIFA World Cup exacerbated the existing tensions between the two states and helped spark a brief four-day war in which over 1000 people died. The war ended inconclusively and El Salvador eventually won the actual match, but was ousted in a subsequent round and did not make the finals.

Comments (View)
28 July 09

I was listening to an old Real Time with Bill Maher podcast and couldn’t stop squealing with laughter when they compared the love notes of Mark Sanford and Mark Foley. A brief recap in case you don’t recall. Sanford (governor of South Carolina) was missing for a full week in June and neither his wife or law enforcement could track him down. Turns out he was having a steamy affair in Argentina with a journalist. As for Foley, in 2006 he was sending downright dirty emails to teenage boys who had interned for him as congressional pages.

Comments (View)
Posted: 9:56 AM

Birthers on the hill. Huffington Post chases down congressmen to ask about Obama’s citizenship.

Comments (View)
Posted: 9:13 AM

This could have been a bit more interesting had they developed their questioning. Nonetheless, I had no idea what a birther was until I watched this video and I certainly wouldn’t have thought it had anything to do with Barack Obama.

Comments (View)
27 July 09
Sarah Palin stepped down yesterday and, even though I covered this, I already forgot the name of the man replacing her as the new governor of Alaska. Anyway, her speech provided no concrete idea of what she’ll do next - I think she’d be ripe for joining The View, or having her own talk show that focuses more on lifestyle, fashion, and pseudo-populist commentary.
So, in commemoration of her dull and folksy speech yesterday, the above image is Palin’s original speech announcing her resignation on July 3. Vanity Fair decided to have a run at the text and see how much work it would need before it was “publishable”. Speech-writers in Wasilla aren’t the same grade as their counterparts in Washington.
The red is courtesy of Vanity Fair's executive literary editor, the blue is from the copy editors, and all green is from the research department.

Sarah Palin stepped down yesterday and, even though I covered this, I already forgot the name of the man replacing her as the new governor of Alaska. Anyway, her speech provided no concrete idea of what she’ll do next - I think she’d be ripe for joining The View, or having her own talk show that focuses more on lifestyle, fashion, and pseudo-populist commentary.

So, in commemoration of her dull and folksy speech yesterday, the above image is Palin’s original speech announcing her resignation on July 3. Vanity Fair decided to have a run at the text and see how much work it would need before it was “publishable”. Speech-writers in Wasilla aren’t the same grade as their counterparts in Washington.

The red is courtesy of Vanity Fair's executive literary editor, the blue is from the copy editors, and all green is from the research department.

Comments (View)
1 July 09
Sometimes I don’t miss home. Oklahoma State Representative Sally Kern has said that America’s economic woes are down to its populace’s general moral debauchery. That’s right, all this porn, sex, divorce, and abortion means Wall Street has taken Main Street out for an all-nighter in Sin City. Previously, Kern has compared homosexuality to toe cancer. Needless to say, Kern is a Republican and said of this economic/moral whirlpool:
“Be it resolved that we, the undersigned, humbly call upon Holy God, our Creator, Sustainer, and Redeemer, to have mercy on this nation, to stay His hand of judgment, and grant a national awakening of righteousness and Christian renewal as we repent of our great sin.”

Sometimes I don’t miss home. Oklahoma State Representative Sally Kern has said that America’s economic woes are down to its populace’s general moral debauchery. That’s right, all this porn, sex, divorce, and abortion means Wall Street has taken Main Street out for an all-nighter in Sin City. Previously, Kern has compared homosexuality to toe cancer. Needless to say, Kern is a Republican and said of this economic/moral whirlpool:

“Be it resolved that we, the undersigned, humbly call upon Holy God, our Creator, Sustainer, and Redeemer, to have mercy on this nation, to stay His hand of judgment, and grant a national awakening of righteousness and Christian renewal as we repent of our great sin.”
Comments (View)
Posted: 9:05 AM
Comments (View)
30 June 09
Many are calling the Iranian unrest the Twitter Revolution, and I agree. The above image, from Pew Research of course, displays that during the week of June 15-21, precisely 98% of the most popular links on Twitter were on Iran.
I have my own concerns on the willingness of online media to turn to Twitter and YouTube. In Iran’s case, these two media proved to be an effective means for the people to tell their story, but how can a 140 character post or an amateur video be fact checked? Essentially, isn’t it foreseeable that some people could feel desperate enough to dramatise or even fake a post or a video to draw more attention. I am not accusing Iranian people but pointing out online’s media blind acceptance to post and repost. Then again, not to post runs the risk of missing the story.
This link shows the results of the study and other information too. Online media, for instance, covered the topic of Iran more than 30% than the printed press. Two reasons for this - unlimited space online versus precious and limited paper, and keeping online information fresh through updates versus avoiding overkill of a topic dominating a single publication.
Iran’s government tried to crackdown on all internet use and Twitter, a social media I am easily bored with although I don’t have a revolution to fight for either, proved to be an effective means of disseminating information from within the oppressive state to the outside world. But, it even helped Iranians communicate with each other as the state-run media was not going to cover the protests honestly.

Many are calling the Iranian unrest the Twitter Revolution, and I agree. The above image, from Pew Research of course, displays that during the week of June 15-21, precisely 98% of the most popular links on Twitter were on Iran.

I have my own concerns on the willingness of online media to turn to Twitter and YouTube. In Iran’s case, these two media proved to be an effective means for the people to tell their story, but how can a 140 character post or an amateur video be fact checked? Essentially, isn’t it foreseeable that some people could feel desperate enough to dramatise or even fake a post or a video to draw more attention. I am not accusing Iranian people but pointing out online’s media blind acceptance to post and repost. Then again, not to post runs the risk of missing the story.

This link shows the results of the study and other information too. Online media, for instance, covered the topic of Iran more than 30% than the printed press. Two reasons for this - unlimited space online versus precious and limited paper, and keeping online information fresh through updates versus avoiding overkill of a topic dominating a single publication.

Iran’s government tried to crackdown on all internet use and Twitter, a social media I am easily bored with although I don’t have a revolution to fight for either, proved to be an effective means of disseminating information from within the oppressive state to the outside world. But, it even helped Iranians communicate with each other as the state-run media was not going to cover the protests honestly.

Comments (View)
24 June 09
This is a Wikipedia list of nuclear weapons arranged by countries. Not a big nuke head myself but this is interesting. Just curious about the naming of the UK’s warhead as Blue Steel - was this pre or post Zoolander? And the Blue Peacock, aka the chicken-powered nuclear bomb. Man, the sun really went down on the empire, huh? On the same list, India had a nuclear test named Smiling Buddha.

This is a Wikipedia list of nuclear weapons arranged by countries. Not a big nuke head myself but this is interesting. Just curious about the naming of the UK’s warhead as Blue Steel - was this pre or post Zoolander? And the Blue Peacock, aka the chicken-powered nuclear bomb. Man, the sun really went down on the empire, huh? On the same list, India had a nuclear test named Smiling Buddha.

Comments (View)
23 June 09
The issue of the burqa is not a religious issue. It is a question of freedom and of women’s dignity. The burqa is not a religious sign. It is a sign of the subjugation, of the submission, of women. I want to say solemnly that it will not be welcome on our territory.

Nicholas Sarkozy addressing parliament at Versailles earlier this week.

I remember the burqa debacle that broke out in Britain a few years back when Jack Straw, the then foreign secretary, asked a woman to remove her burqa during a meeting as his constituency office because he could not hear her. There was the typical uproar in the tabloids, but to my mind, no British politicans were this exact and defiant about the burqa’s state in Britain. The fifth Republic has very different ideas. More here.

Comments (View)
19 June 09
The US Senate has unanimously passed a bill that is a sort of formal apology for the country’s history of slavery and racial segregation. It is a symbolic gesture and explicitly says it does not include reparations. The Senate has done this kind of thing before - for instance with the Japanese internment camps, another fascinating but sad chapter in US history.
In the 1800s various politicians described slavery as a necessary evil, including Thomas Jefferson - the country’s third president and the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (now more famous for lousy Nicolas Cage films). Jefferson wrote in a letter in 1820: “We have the wolf by the ear, and we can neither hold him, nor safely let him go. Justice is in one scale, and self-preservation in the other.”
The 1860 census reveals the slave population in each of the states, which existed at the time. You’d be feeling pretty lonely in Kansas. Always important reminder, slavery was not just black. America would shackle and whip nearly anyone it could get its hands on.

The US Senate has unanimously passed a bill that is a sort of formal apology for the country’s history of slavery and racial segregation. It is a symbolic gesture and explicitly says it does not include reparations. The Senate has done this kind of thing before - for instance with the Japanese internment camps, another fascinating but sad chapter in US history.

In the 1800s various politicians described slavery as a necessary evil, including Thomas Jefferson - the country’s third president and the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (now more famous for lousy Nicolas Cage films). Jefferson wrote in a letter in 1820: “We have the wolf by the ear, and we can neither hold him, nor safely let him go. Justice is in one scale, and self-preservation in the other.”

The 1860 census reveals the slave population in each of the states, which existed at the time. You’d be feeling pretty lonely in Kansas. Always important reminder, slavery was not just black. America would shackle and whip nearly anyone it could get its hands on.

Comments (View)
17 June 09
Hearty goodness from The Economist - Arming up - The world’s biggest military spenders by population:
GLOBAL military expenditure rose by 4% in 2008 to a record $1.46 trillion, according to a new report by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. Israel spends most on defence relative to its population, shelling out over $2,300 a person, over $300 more than America. Small and rich countries, and notably Gulf states, feature prominently by this measure. Saudi Arabia ranks ninth in absolute spending, but sixth by population. China has increased spending by 10% to $85 billion to become the world’s second largest spender. But it is still dwarfed by America, whose outlay of $607 billion is higher than that of the next 14 biggest spenders combined.

(link)

Hearty goodness from The Economist - Arming up - The world’s biggest military spenders by population:

GLOBAL military expenditure rose by 4% in 2008 to a record $1.46 trillion, according to a new report by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. Israel spends most on defence relative to its population, shelling out over $2,300 a person, over $300 more than America. Small and rich countries, and notably Gulf states, feature prominently by this measure. Saudi Arabia ranks ninth in absolute spending, but sixth by population. China has increased spending by 10% to $85 billion to become the world’s second largest spender. But it is still dwarfed by America, whose outlay of $607 billion is higher than that of the next 14 biggest spenders combined.

(link)
Comments (View)
15 June 09
Had to make an editorial decision here. The Big Picture, always a good pictorial resource, has a decent gallery of images from last Friday’s elections in Iran. The turn out, at 85% was massive, but  Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the incumbent, took more than 60% of the vote to claim victory. The opposition are saying he ‘stole’ it. The NYTimes in an editorial today said given Iran’s complete lack of transparency and the government’s thuggish reaction fraud is most likely the case.
Remarkably, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the supreme leader, has ordered an investigation. This does offer hope to the opposition. And that is why I chose this picture of the two female supporters, wearing the green colours of  Mir Hossein Moussavi, the opposition reformist leader. More pictures here, as well as a profile I posted earlier this year of President Ahmadinejad.

Had to make an editorial decision here. The Big Picture, always a good pictorial resource, has a decent gallery of images from last Friday’s elections in Iran. The turn out, at 85% was massive, but Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the incumbent, took more than 60% of the vote to claim victory. The opposition are saying he ‘stole’ it. The NYTimes in an editorial today said given Iran’s complete lack of transparency and the government’s thuggish reaction fraud is most likely the case.

Remarkably, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the supreme leader, has ordered an investigation. This does offer hope to the opposition. And that is why I chose this picture of the two female supporters, wearing the green colours of Mir Hossein Moussavi, the opposition reformist leader. More pictures here, as well as a profile I posted earlier this year of President Ahmadinejad.

Tags: iran politics
Comments (View)
5 June 09

what obama’s cairo speech means

I haven’t read through Obama’s entire Cairo speech yet, but Robert Kaplan, writing in The Atlantic, has given it an unreserved thumbs up.

"He did all this with a polished delivery – pronouncing correctly all Arabic and other foreign names – and without generally apologizing for America. He said America’s commitment to Afghanistan will not falter; that Iraq was better off without Saddam Hussein; and that America’s bond with Israel is unbreakable. He said, in an obvious reference to the rants of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, that Holocaust denial and the promotion of stereotypes and anti-Semitism are wrong. Indeed, he noted that the important question for Iran is not what it is against, but what kind of a future it wants to build. By making America’s historical vision of a future city on a hill synonymous with that of his young Muslim audience, he instantly put Iran on the defensive."

Comments (View)
29 May 09
Obama had Shephard Fairey. Paul McAdam has a six pack of Miller on his head. Obama had hope. McAdam has alcohol. Move over Obama.

Obama had Shephard Fairey. Paul McAdam has a six pack of Miller on his head. Obama had hope. McAdam has alcohol. Move over Obama.

Comments (View)
Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh