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about out of sight

A site of original and unoriginal content meant to entertain and inform. Out of Sight is edited by JJ O'Donoghue and William Hilderbrandt.

more about out of sight

If this site had to be summed up in one word and a preceding parenthetical phrase, then it would be (hopefully) entertaining. Think of it as an archive of some of the most interesting articles, videos, photography, and miscellany that JJ and William find online.

Presently the two have hopes of expanding the site to include some of their own work, and when they do just watch the hilarity ensue.

In the meantime please leave comments on posts - whether you like or dislike - and make suggestions as to what you want to see more of. For some of you it's more tits and ass, for others you prefer men with beards, and for one of you (you know who I am talking about) it's all about jam.

one more thing on out of sight

Out of sight is Will and JJ's attempt to get noticed and invited on daytime TV or any Fox TV show. Before out of sight, there was rich and creamy, a hugely popular blog for spammers who wanted to sell us penis enhancing products. They were wasting their time.

But to stick to the augmentation analogy, out of sight at its best is a brain enhancing website. That's a radical statement guys.

What you'll find on the site is a ménage à trois of humour, skepticism, intelligence and titilation. We really enjoy comments and recommendations and we hope to build up a community of followers so that we then add a subscription wall and take on the Financial Times or Playboy. Or just get jobs with them.

who is this stud william?

William lives in Paris. At the start of 2009 he left London and all his friends and his bad job to come to France, where he hardly speaks the language, to be with his girlfriend. Officially he is very happy to finally be living with her but occasionally he does get nostalgic for London.

He grew up in the US - Oklahoma (please do not hum the musical!) - and studied philosophy before going to London for a Master's in journalism. His work has not been published by the best in the industry, such as The New York Times, The Atlantic Monthly, The Economist, Mother Jones, McSweeney's, and many, many more.

Currently he is freelancing at radio and TV gigs, slowly acquiring technical skills he hopes he can eventually use to make documentary and feature films that one day will not be produced by some of the world's best film studios.

who is this wise guy jj?

Quite early on in life JJ discovered that he was a fabricator. In 2006 his mum and dad invited him to leave their home in Cork, Ireland and head for London, where he now resides, to shake up the city. He cycles hard, drinks hard and blogs harder. You get the picture.

Currently he's alive, and, like most people his age he's 29. He longs for the day Japan get's moved right next to Ireland, and that Cork wins the world series in hurling. More than anything else he want's a book deal. Failing that a decent sandwich with French mustard, mayonnaise and Ballymaloe relish in it.

27 August 09
These photos are by Pieter Hugo, one of my favourite photographers, especially seeing as I picked up his book “The Hyena & Other Men” for £3. This series is from Nollywood, Nigeria’s film making industry. Hugo asked his subjects, all actors and assistants, “to recreate Nollywood myths and symbols as if they were on movie sets.”
I saw a few Nollywood movies a few years back in Zimbabwe, they are unlike anything I had even seen before. The narratives are simple and the settings are ordinary. It’s so far removed from Hollywood it’s jarring. [thanks, Sabine]

These photos are by Pieter Hugo, one of my favourite photographers, especially seeing as I picked up his book “The Hyena & Other Men” for £3. This series is from Nollywood, Nigeria’s film making industry. Hugo asked his subjects, all actors and assistants, “to recreate Nollywood myths and symbols as if they were on movie sets.”

I saw a few Nollywood movies a few years back in Zimbabwe, they are unlike anything I had even seen before. The narratives are simple and the settings are ordinary. It’s so far removed from Hollywood it’s jarring. [thanks, Sabine]

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24 August 09
The Lens blog has a slideshow on some of the most famous incidents of doctoring famous photos. Above is the so-called “Falling Soldier” taken by Robert Capa during the Spanish Civil War. In a book published this year by José Manuel Susperregu concludes that the Capa photo was almost certainly staged.

The Lens blog has a slideshow on some of the most famous incidents of doctoring famous photos. Above is the so-called “Falling Soldier” taken by Robert Capa during the Spanish Civil War. In a book published this year by José Manuel Susperregu concludes that the Capa photo was almost certainly staged.

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11 August 09

It’s your last meal on earth, after that you’ll be executed. What meal would you request? Photographer James Reynolds documents some of the meals as requested by death row prisoners. It’s a nice idea but I wish there was more to it. For instance, there’s no captions, no information about who these prisoners were, were they were held, why one chose just a packet of smokes. Nice, but not enough.

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24 July 09

All photos from Nguan. This set is from Shibuya in Tokyo. What’s interesting is that some of the passers-by are aware of the prying lens and react accordingly. Some are evidently unhappy with the camera, while others revel in the voyeurism and exposure. Most people probably have no idea that the mundane walk to work, or to the shops, is documented and on the web.

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22 July 09
I know it’s typically Tumblrish to post a photo with a dumb-ass caption like, “Ha ha”. But seriously, fair play to this woman, doing it for the mud and the laughs. Via The Big Picture.

I know it’s typically Tumblrish to post a photo with a dumb-ass caption like, “Ha ha”. But seriously, fair play to this woman, doing it for the mud and the laughs. Via The Big Picture.

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Posted: 9:46 AM

Paris brings out the cliches in everyone, especially those armed with a digital camera. Everywhere we wandered last weekend tourists were lining up the Eiffel Tower to squeeze between their thumb and forefinger, drop it into their mouth, or even, in one case, to imagine it as a sausage. Silly but essential shenanigans.

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Posted: 9:38 AM

Over the weekend I saw Martin Parr’s latest exhibition Planète Parr, currently both inside and outside (see photos) the Jeu de Paume in Paris. Over the years he went to many tourism hot spots and tried to capture tourists doing what they’re best at: taking up space, consuming, sweating, tanning, eating, exploiting, and, at times, disrespecting. Have to say though, I kind of liked seeing the bright and colourful photos outside with the backdrop of trees and urban landscape.

I liked some of the photos enough but didn’t venture inside to see the rest. Instead I spent 2 euros on a photobooth for my friends and myself which didn’t work…this soured me until later when Sabine showed me her foot.

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14 July 09

I went “posh-camping” this past weekend in Wales. It couldn’t be further than roughing it in a washed-out tent at Glastonbury. Part of me misses this madness. Most of me doesn’t. More pictures on the Big Picture.

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10 July 09
Photographer Franck Allais has new work up on his website. This is one of my favourites.

Photographer Franck Allais has new work up on his website. This is one of my favourites.

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9 July 09
I was out at Centre Pompidou in Paris on Saturday when I snapped this photo from the fourth floor. It then turned into this - my first attempt at tilt-shift photography (click on image to enlarge). JJ’s written about this before and here is a handy tutorial.

I was out at Centre Pompidou in Paris on Saturday when I snapped this photo from the fourth floor. It then turned into this - my first attempt at tilt-shift photography (click on image to enlarge). JJ’s written about this before and here is a handy tutorial.

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8 July 09

Japanese journalist and photographer Kyoichi Tsuzuki is back in London with a joint show at the Wapping Project. I’ve been reading up about his last exhibition in London on “happy victims” - Japanese people hooked on designer labels and the excesses they would go to fill their apartments with expenisve clothes. The quote below is from an interview in Theme Magazine in which he draws a comparision between collecting books and deisgner clothing.

"I don’t want to say it’s stupid, but imagine it: A very small room, the person doesn’t have a lot of money but they spend all their money on books, and they fill their small room with books, you wouldn’t say they’re stupid. Right? But a small room filled with Comme des Garçons, looks really stupid, no? That is our prejudice—that the person who spends all their money on books looks better than the person with Comme des Garçons. There’s a hierarchy: Books have the highest position, then records, and fashion is kind of on the bottom. But it’s all the same. It’s how your passion flows"

Tsuzuki’s most famous book is called Tokyo Style and I would be happy for anyone to get it for me.

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30 June 09
When dad is a tripod and son is a camera extender.

lickystickypickyme:
A child is held up by his father during the opening ceremony of the sixth Annual International Cine Fest Petrobas Brazil at Summer Stage in Central Park in New York CityPicture: AP

When dad is a tripod and son is a camera extender.

lickystickypickyme:

A child is held up by his father during the opening ceremony of the sixth Annual International Cine Fest Petrobas Brazil at Summer Stage in Central Park in New York City
Picture: AP

Reblogged: lickystickypickyshe

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24 June 09
I have been looking through the online gallery of photographer  Christoph Morlinghaus. The interior shots of ultra-modern churches are quite something; a few look like they could double as sets from Space Odyssey. Morlinghuas’s website is well worth a visit. There’s even a scintilla of humour in there: “..is a native of Hamburg, Germany but you shouldn’t hold that against him.” [via but does it float]

I have been looking through the online gallery of photographer Christoph Morlinghaus. The interior shots of ultra-modern churches are quite something; a few look like they could double as sets from Space Odyssey. Morlinghuas’s website is well worth a visit. There’s even a scintilla of humour in there: “..is a native of Hamburg, Germany but you shouldn’t hold that against him.” [via but does it float]

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18 June 09
My grandmother told me that you should never play with your food. She wouldn’t be too happy with Pierre Javelle and Akiko Ida then, who have placed little people in all types of gastronomical surroundings. More photos here. Actually she couldn’t stand cameras, so this duo would be up there with the Black and Tans.

My grandmother told me that you should never play with your food. She wouldn’t be too happy with Pierre Javelle and Akiko Ida then, who have placed little people in all types of gastronomical surroundings. More photos here. Actually she couldn’t stand cameras, so this duo would be up there with the Black and Tans.

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17 June 09
The Fallen Princesses project takes Disney heroines and places them in scenarios where the story didn’t arrive at a Hollywood ending. There’s more images over at JPG, but this one is my favourite.

"The project was inspired by my observation of three-year-old girls, who were developing an interest in Disney’s Fairy tales. As a new mother I have been able to get a close up look at the phenomenon of young girls fascinated with Princesses and their desire to dress up like them. The Disney versions almost always have sad beginning, with an overbearing female villain, and the end is predictably a happy one."

The Fallen Princesses project takes Disney heroines and places them in scenarios where the story didn’t arrive at a Hollywood ending. There’s more images over at JPG, but this one is my favourite.

"The project was inspired by my observation of three-year-old girls, who were developing an interest in Disney’s Fairy tales. As a new mother I have been able to get a close up look at the phenomenon of young girls fascinated with Princesses and their desire to dress up like them. The Disney versions almost always have sad beginning, with an overbearing female villain, and the end is predictably a happy one."

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Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh