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about out of sight

A site of original and unoriginal content meant to entertain and inform. Out of Sight is edited by JJ O'Donoghue and William Hilderbrandt.

more about out of sight

If this site had to be summed up in one word and a preceding parenthetical phrase, then it would be (hopefully) entertaining. Think of it as an archive of some of the most interesting articles, videos, photography, and miscellany that JJ and William find online.

Presently the two have hopes of expanding the site to include some of their own work, and when they do just watch the hilarity ensue.

In the meantime please leave comments on posts - whether you like or dislike - and make suggestions as to what you want to see more of. For some of you it's more tits and ass, for others you prefer men with beards, and for one of you (you know who I am talking about) it's all about jam.

one more thing on out of sight

Out of sight is Will and JJ's attempt to get noticed and invited on daytime TV or any Fox TV show. Before out of sight, there was rich and creamy, a hugely popular blog for spammers who wanted to sell us penis enhancing products. They were wasting their time.

But to stick to the augmentation analogy, out of sight at its best is a brain enhancing website. That's a radical statement guys.

What you'll find on the site is a ménage à trois of humour, skepticism, intelligence and titilation. We really enjoy comments and recommendations and we hope to build up a community of followers so that we then add a subscription wall and take on the Financial Times or Playboy. Or just get jobs with them.

who is this stud william?

William lives in Paris. At the start of 2009 he left London and all his friends and his bad job to come to France, where he hardly speaks the language, to be with his girlfriend. Officially he is very happy to finally be living with her but occasionally he does get nostalgic for London.

He grew up in the US - Oklahoma (please do not hum the musical!) - and studied philosophy before going to London for a Master's in journalism. His work has not been published by the best in the industry, such as The New York Times, The Atlantic Monthly, The Economist, Mother Jones, McSweeney's, and many, many more.

Currently he is freelancing at radio and TV gigs, slowly acquiring technical skills he hopes he can eventually use to make documentary and feature films that one day will not be produced by some of the world's best film studios.

who is this wise guy jj?

Quite early on in life JJ discovered that he was a fabricator. In 2006 his mum and dad invited him to leave their home in Cork, Ireland and head for London, where he now resides, to shake up the city. He cycles hard, drinks hard and blogs harder. You get the picture.

Currently he's alive, and, like most people his age he's 29. He longs for the day Japan get's moved right next to Ireland, and that Cork wins the world series in hurling. More than anything else he want's a book deal. Failing that a decent sandwich with French mustard, mayonnaise and Ballymaloe relish in it.

30 June 09
Many are calling the Iranian unrest the Twitter Revolution, and I agree. The above image, from Pew Research of course, displays that during the week of June 15-21, precisely 98% of the most popular links on Twitter were on Iran.
I have my own concerns on the willingness of online media to turn to Twitter and YouTube. In Iran’s case, these two media proved to be an effective means for the people to tell their story, but how can a 140 character post or an amateur video be fact checked? Essentially, isn’t it foreseeable that some people could feel desperate enough to dramatise or even fake a post or a video to draw more attention. I am not accusing Iranian people but pointing out online’s media blind acceptance to post and repost. Then again, not to post runs the risk of missing the story.
This link shows the results of the study and other information too. Online media, for instance, covered the topic of Iran more than 30% than the printed press. Two reasons for this - unlimited space online versus precious and limited paper, and keeping online information fresh through updates versus avoiding overkill of a topic dominating a single publication.
Iran’s government tried to crackdown on all internet use and Twitter, a social media I am easily bored with although I don’t have a revolution to fight for either, proved to be an effective means of disseminating information from within the oppressive state to the outside world. But, it even helped Iranians communicate with each other as the state-run media was not going to cover the protests honestly.

Many are calling the Iranian unrest the Twitter Revolution, and I agree. The above image, from Pew Research of course, displays that during the week of June 15-21, precisely 98% of the most popular links on Twitter were on Iran.

I have my own concerns on the willingness of online media to turn to Twitter and YouTube. In Iran’s case, these two media proved to be an effective means for the people to tell their story, but how can a 140 character post or an amateur video be fact checked? Essentially, isn’t it foreseeable that some people could feel desperate enough to dramatise or even fake a post or a video to draw more attention. I am not accusing Iranian people but pointing out online’s media blind acceptance to post and repost. Then again, not to post runs the risk of missing the story.

This link shows the results of the study and other information too. Online media, for instance, covered the topic of Iran more than 30% than the printed press. Two reasons for this - unlimited space online versus precious and limited paper, and keeping online information fresh through updates versus avoiding overkill of a topic dominating a single publication.

Iran’s government tried to crackdown on all internet use and Twitter, a social media I am easily bored with although I don’t have a revolution to fight for either, proved to be an effective means of disseminating information from within the oppressive state to the outside world. But, it even helped Iranians communicate with each other as the state-run media was not going to cover the protests honestly.

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24 June 09

The Atlantic on The Economist

Everyone knows the print industry has taken heavy blows. With an air of Nietszche, our friend Mr Oyry proudly declared print to be dead. But The Atlantic's Michael Hirschorn sizes up the newsweeklies - the rapidly fading US titles Time and Newsweek and contrasts them to the increasing success of the UK’s The Economist. There is some nice objective criticism - hits and praise - for each title in here, so it’s worth a read.

True, The Economist virtually never gets scoops, and the information it does provide is available elsewhere … if you care to spend 20 hours Googling. But now that information is infinitely replicable and pervasive, original reporting will never again receive its due. The real value of The Economist lies in its smart analysis of everything it deems worth knowing—and smart packaging, which may be the last truly unique attribute in the digital age.

For a magazine that effectively blogged avant la lettre, The Economist has never had much digital savvy. It offered a complex mix of free and paid content (rarely a winning strategy) until two years ago and was so unprepared for the Internet that it couldn’t even secure theeconomist.com as its Web domain. (It later tried, unsuccessfully, to claim the URL.) Today, access to the site is free of charge, excepting deep archival material, but while editors have made some desultory efforts at adding social-networking features, most of the magazine’s readers seem to have no idea the site exists. While other publications whore themselves to Google, The Huffington Post, and the Drudge Report, almost no one links to The Economist. It sits primly apart from the orgy of link love elsewhere on the Web.

This turns out to have been a lucky accident. Unlike practically all other media “brands,” The Economist remains primarily a print product, and it is valued accordingly. In other words, readers continue to believe its stories have some value. As a result, The Economist has become a living test case of the path not taken by Time and Newsweek, whose Web strategies have succeeded in grabbing eyeballs (Time has 4.7 million unique users a month, and Newsweekhas 2 million, compared with The Economist’s 700,000, according to one measure) while dooming their print products to near irrelevance.

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18 May 09

Swine flu propaganda, c. 1976. Don’t just sit there, panic! Obviously in a matter a moments the bug will spread across the country and everyone will die due to their arrogance, or their unwise ability to play down modern-era plague. As the jive-talkin’ basketballer in the video says, “Swine flu? Man, I’m too fast for that to catch me.” [via Chunnel]

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15 May 09
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14 May 09

So pardon me if I am a bit tardy in posting this but it is still worthy to be posted - at least it meets Out of Sight's criteria: funny and offensive. Wanda Sykes was the featured comedian at last week's White House Correspondents' Dinner, and she killed. She slams conservative pundit Rush Limbaugh at 2min and Fox's wacko Sean Hannity at 3min15sec.

This video is part two of her routine, so here’s part one. And in case you don’t recall, Mr Stephen Colbert had a gem of performance of his own at the same event in 2006 when he roasted Bush.

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Posted: 10:24 AM

Another great video by Media Matters. This one is on the abhorrent logic by conservative media on gay marriage.

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8 May 09
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7 May 09

Another Swine Bug Raises Scientists’ Concerns | Wired Science

Interesting but is it more scare-mongering or fair flagging of a reasonable concern?Come on, Wired, say it ain’t so! From the article:

The disease strikes North American pigs, but American humans were assumed to be safe. Only two human cases have been reported in the United States, where farmers keep a greater distance from their livestock, and dispose of meat known to come from sick animals.

Nevertheless, the assumption of safety may be false. In a study published last year in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Gray and fellow University of Iowa epidemiologist Tara Smith described the first search for S. suis in a U.S. population. Seven out of 73 Iowa hog-farm workers tested positive for exposure, compared to just one positive test in a 67-person control group.

Smith and Gray didn’t extrapolate national exposure levels from those geographically limited findings, but it’s not unreasonable to think a comparable ratio of pig farmers are affected nationwide. The S. suismicrobe is common, able to live in the tonsils for years without causing symptoms, difficult to eradicate with antibiotics and spread by the cross-country transportation of millions of pigs every year.

“You could say that between 5 and 10 percent of workers in the U.S. might be infected,” said Marcelo Gottschalk, a University of Montreal veterinary pathologist and one of the world’s foremost S. suisresearchers. “I don’t know if it’s true, but the extrapolation is fair enough.”
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Posted: 8:05 AM

Nothing new about Fox News being downright naughty but Media Matters put together this video to show bits and pieces (100 to be precise) of how the programme covered the first 100 days of Obama’s presidency. Granted much of these quotes are from pundits but many are from journos themselves. Apparently if you can incite unrest and inflame hatred then you deserve airtime over at Fox. Here’s some of the most ridiculous snips:

  • "Went on a jihad against lobbyists.”

    "Commisar Obama."

    "The president has declared a war against prosperity."

    "Obama’s agenda towards socialism."

    "He wants a catastrophe."

    "Obama’s Ponzi scheme."

    "What’s a nice girl like you doing in the Obama White House?"

    "This is Joseph Stalin without the bloodshed."

    "Obama attacks America."

    "It’s a bit early to declare the presidency a failure but i would like to do it."

    "Obama is apologising to the frenchy french for our arrogance."

    "Exactly what happened in the lead-up to Hitler."

    "100 days of america going down the drain."

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5 May 09
Finally. Thank you very much Evolved and Rat/i/onal. Every media should be busying itself with quieting the panic as opposed to building it, and I work for one of the ballbag companies guilty of this.
I know that publishers need to sell papers, but at least put things in proportion. While the World Health Organization says many people are experiencing only mild symptoms and suspect the deaths resulting from Influenza A in Mexico occurred due to so yet unknown geographic factor, we could return our attention to the long forgotten bird flu that spread around Asia earlier this decade. It hasn’t disappeared, and as this Slate article points out, continues to maintain a 60% fatality rate. The good news is the virus is dman hard to catch so it doesn’t spread as quickly as the swine flu, oops, Influenza A.

Finally. Thank you very much Evolved and Rat/i/onal. Every media should be busying itself with quieting the panic as opposed to building it, and I work for one of the ballbag companies guilty of this.

I know that publishers need to sell papers, but at least put things in proportion. While the World Health Organization says many people are experiencing only mild symptoms and suspect the deaths resulting from Influenza A in Mexico occurred due to so yet unknown geographic factor, we could return our attention to the long forgotten bird flu that spread around Asia earlier this decade. It hasn’t disappeared, and as this Slate article points out, continues to maintain a 60% fatality rate. The good news is the virus is dman hard to catch so it doesn’t spread as quickly as the swine flu, oops, Influenza A.

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Posted: 8:06 AM
The New York Times has a piece on Amazon’s third generation e-Reader, the Kindle. Some are hoping that such devices will provide a boost to the stumbling print industry precisely because this version of the Kindle comes in a larger size that will better capture the layout of magazines and newspapers…trying to imitate the natural joy of reading the paper original itself.
I have to admit that I was utterly disgusted when the Kindle was first released some years back but have since come full circle. I always take a bag with me but I prefer it to be as lightly packed as possible and if I could have a device that holds all my subscriptions as well as potential to store thousands and thousands of books, then I could casually read virtually anything I fancy on my morning commute, in a waiting room, while my girlfriend shops, etc - all without adding bulk to my bag and pain to my back. Though I am waiting for a high-resolution and colour Kindle before I splash the cash.

The New York Times has a piece on Amazon’s third generation e-Reader, the Kindle. Some are hoping that such devices will provide a boost to the stumbling print industry precisely because this version of the Kindle comes in a larger size that will better capture the layout of magazines and newspapers…trying to imitate the natural joy of reading the paper original itself.

I have to admit that I was utterly disgusted when the Kindle was first released some years back but have since come full circle. I always take a bag with me but I prefer it to be as lightly packed as possible and if I could have a device that holds all my subscriptions as well as potential to store thousands and thousands of books, then I could casually read virtually anything I fancy on my morning commute, in a waiting room, while my girlfriend shops, etc - all without adding bulk to my bag and pain to my back. Though I am waiting for a high-resolution and colour Kindle before I splash the cash.

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1 April 09
I like this photo purely because I have always been curious to find out what’s opposite No. 10 Downing Street, the official residence of the British prime minister in London. Here’s what the leaders see when they face the media. Media.

I like this photo purely because I have always been curious to find out what’s opposite No. 10 Downing Street, the official residence of the British prime minister in London. Here’s what the leaders see when they face the media. Media.

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Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh