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about out of sight

A site of original and unoriginal content meant to entertain and inform. Out of Sight is edited by JJ O'Donoghue and William Hilderbrandt.

more about out of sight

If this site had to be summed up in one word and a preceding parenthetical phrase, then it would be (hopefully) entertaining. Think of it as an archive of some of the most interesting articles, videos, photography, and miscellany that JJ and William find online.

Presently the two have hopes of expanding the site to include some of their own work, and when they do just watch the hilarity ensue.

In the meantime please leave comments on posts - whether you like or dislike - and make suggestions as to what you want to see more of. For some of you it's more tits and ass, for others you prefer men with beards, and for one of you (you know who I am talking about) it's all about jam.

one more thing on out of sight

Out of sight is Will and JJ's attempt to get noticed and invited on daytime TV or any Fox TV show. Before out of sight, there was rich and creamy, a hugely popular blog for spammers who wanted to sell us penis enhancing products. They were wasting their time.

But to stick to the augmentation analogy, out of sight at its best is a brain enhancing website. That's a radical statement guys.

What you'll find on the site is a ménage à trois of humour, skepticism, intelligence and titilation. We really enjoy comments and recommendations and we hope to build up a community of followers so that we then add a subscription wall and take on the Financial Times or Playboy. Or just get jobs with them.

who is this stud william?

William lives in Paris. At the start of 2009 he left London and all his friends and his bad job to come to France, where he hardly speaks the language, to be with his girlfriend. Officially he is very happy to finally be living with her but occasionally he does get nostalgic for London.

He grew up in the US - Oklahoma (please do not hum the musical!) - and studied philosophy before going to London for a Master's in journalism. His work has not been published by the best in the industry, such as The New York Times, The Atlantic Monthly, The Economist, Mother Jones, McSweeney's, and many, many more.

Currently he is freelancing at radio and TV gigs, slowly acquiring technical skills he hopes he can eventually use to make documentary and feature films that one day will not be produced by some of the world's best film studios.

who is this wise guy jj?

Quite early on in life JJ discovered that he was a fabricator. In 2006 his mum and dad invited him to leave their home in Cork, Ireland and head for London, where he now resides, to shake up the city. He cycles hard, drinks hard and blogs harder. You get the picture.

Currently he's alive, and, like most people his age he's 29. He longs for the day Japan get's moved right next to Ireland, and that Cork wins the world series in hurling. More than anything else he want's a book deal. Failing that a decent sandwich with French mustard, mayonnaise and Ballymaloe relish in it.

19 June 09
Chloe’s got some of her new screen prints up on her blog. They’re for a Stolen Space summer group show. The diver, one of Chloe’s favourite motifs, is definitely back. Chloe explains why she is obsessed with figures falling from the sky here and here’s an excerpt from a short interview I did with Chloe for her about page in her new-ish blog.
I am: Irish, female, 28 (at time of writing) and an expert skipper.I eat: probably too much, luckily most of the food I love is healthy stuff, vegetables, fish but I have weaknesses that I do indulge, bread and cheese with ballymaloe relish especially with a hangover, cake and chocolate. My ultimate indulgence is lemon tart but I save that for rainy days. When I was little I used to ask my Mum if I could go to town (Cork  -the Metropole Hotel) with her and eat juicy scones instead of going to school and sometimes she would let me! Hence my love of food started early.I think: Once upon a time I had time to think about space, the universe, the inside of the Earth, the past, the future, love, loss, happiness. These days when I wake up I have a list of things to do that day running through my head. I cant decide if this is a normal part of becoming an adult or a spin off from the digital age we live in – why think when you can Google?I want: to learn to drive and if I say it enough it might happen.
Continue reading…

Chloe’s got some of her new screen prints up on her blog. They’re for a Stolen Space summer group show. The diver, one of Chloe’s favourite motifs, is definitely back. Chloe explains why she is obsessed with figures falling from the sky here and here’s an excerpt from a short interview I did with Chloe for her about page in her new-ish blog.

I am: Irish, female, 28 (at time of writing) and an expert skipper.

I eat: probably too much, luckily most of the food I love is healthy stuff, vegetables, fish but I have weaknesses that I do indulge, bread and cheese with ballymaloe relish especially with a hangover, cake and chocolate. My ultimate indulgence is lemon tart but I save that for rainy days. When I was little I used to ask my Mum if I could go to town (Cork  -the Metropole Hotel) with her and eat juicy scones instead of going to school and sometimes she would let me! Hence my love of food started early.

I think: Once upon a time I had time to think about space, the universe, the inside of the Earth, the past, the future, love, loss, happiness. These days when I wake up I have a list of things to do that day running through my head. I cant decide if this is a normal part of becoming an adult or a spin off from the digital age we live in – why think when you can Google?

I want: to learn to drive and if I say it enough it might happen.

Continue reading…

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18 May 09
Chloe Early’s slow assault on the web continues, she’s started blogging at chloepaintspictures (as opposed to chloegivesouttoconorandjjfordrinkingonaschoolnight). Above is the banner. Happy blogging C.

Chloe Early’s slow assault on the web continues, she’s started blogging at chloepaintspictures (as opposed to chloegivesouttoconorandjjfordrinkingonaschoolnight). Above is the banner. Happy blogging C.

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17 April 09

new work from team conor and chloe, on show in LA

strangemusic

Strange Music of the Human Sphere - Conor Harringtonairbourne

Airbourne - Chloe Early

As promised, new work from Chloe Early and Conor Harington. Team C&C are getting their teeth whitened ahead of tomorrow’s exhibition opening at Kinsey/Desforges in LA. Short interview here with Conor and Chloe.

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6 April 09
Chloe Early and Conor Harrington have been holed up in their studios in Brick Lane for the past few months. Conor even stayed put with the paints and brushes late one Saturday evening in March when Ireland actually won a competition other than the Eurovision. Why? A new joint show. In America. Ooooooooooo.
So what takes you off to LA?
Conor: We’re doing a show together at Kinsey/Desforges gallery.
This is the first time you’ve done a show together, what’s the preparation been like? 
Chloe: It’s been the same as when we don’t show together; we get up, go to the studio, do some painting, ignore each other  -come home, eat dinner - ignore each other a bit more - all in all a wonderful experience, we have become closer.
Conor: There have been tears and tantrums but we’ve just about kept it together.What’s the name of the show and how long does it run for?
Conor: We’ve called it “Chasing Castles” and it’ll run for about five weeks from April 18 to May 23.
Have you ever been to LA before? 
Both: No.
What are you expecting? 
Chloe: Palm trees, super highways, celebrities, perfect bodies
Conor: Sunshine, dark orange tans, whiter than white teeth and plastic people. But hopefully a few nice people as well.
Will you be painting elephants or any other live animals? 
Conor: I’m going to buy a mini dog but I’m not going to paint it.
Chloe: Painting animals? No, but I am expecting to become friends with a pet pig.
You can have dinner or pints with one celebrity, who’s it to be?
Dita Von Teese.
Mickey Mouse.
I’ll leave it to your imagination to figure out who picked whom. Click on their websites to see more of Conor and Chloe’s work. Hope you both have a great time, Chasing Castles, pigs, Mickey Mouse and Ditta Von T in LA. I’ll post new paintings from team C&C on Out of Sight as soon as they go online.

Chloe Early and Conor Harrington have been holed up in their studios in Brick Lane for the past few months. Conor even stayed put with the paints and brushes late one Saturday evening in March when Ireland actually won a competition other than the Eurovision. Why? A new joint show. In America. Ooooooooooo.

So what takes you off to LA?

Conor: We’re doing a show together at Kinsey/Desforges gallery.

This is the first time you’ve done a show together, what’s the preparation been like?

Chloe: It’s been the same as when we don’t show together; we get up, go to the studio, do some painting, ignore each other  -come home, eat dinner - ignore each other a bit more - all in all a wonderful experience, we have become closer.

Conor: There have been tears and tantrums but we’ve just about kept it together.

What’s the name of the show and how long does it run for?

Conor: We’ve called it “Chasing Castles” and it’ll run for about five weeks from April 18 to May 23.

Have you ever been to LA before?

Both: No.

What are you expecting?

Chloe: Palm trees, super highways, celebrities, perfect bodies

Conor: Sunshine, dark orange tans, whiter than white teeth and plastic people. But hopefully a few nice people as well.

Will you be painting elephants or any other live animals?

Conor: I’m going to buy a mini dog but I’m not going to paint it.

Chloe: Painting animals? No, but I am expecting to become friends with a pet pig.

You can have dinner or pints with one celebrity, who’s it to be?

Dita Von Teese.

Mickey Mouse.

I’ll leave it to your imagination to figure out who picked whom. Click on their websites to see more of Conor and Chloe’s work. Hope you both have a great time, Chasing Castles, pigs, Mickey Mouse and Ditta Von T in LA. I’ll post new paintings from team C&C on Out of Sight as soon as they go online.

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15 March 09
Here’s a Q&A I did with Chloe Early around the time of her most recent solo show in London in late 2008. Chloe’s next show, Chasing Castles, with Conor Harrington opens in Los Angeles in April, so hopefully there’ll be more pics, questions and cups of tea (roobois - so Dalston) to come. Pictured above are details from Bloom & Bounty and Foreign Correspondent.
The Eye of the Storm - Oil & Gloss on AluminiumChloe Early’s second solo show at The Stolen Space Gallery, Ladies and Gentlemen we are Spinning in Space, has just finished up. We asked Chloe about her new paintings, their connections with the Great Gatsby and speaking to yourself in French.Let’s start at the top, or the title, where does the name “Ladies and Gentlemen…” come from?The title came from an article I read last year about the band Spiritualized, some years ago they had an album called Ladies and Gentlemen we are Floating in Space and they had taken the title from a line in the book Sophie’s World.

"Only philosophers embark on this perilous expedition to the outermost reaches of language and existence. Some of them fall off, but others cling on desperately and yell at the people nestling deep in the snug softness, stuffing themselves with delicious food and drink. ‘Ladies and Gentlemen,’ they yell, ‘we are floating in space!’ But none of the people down there care."

I liked both the title and the context from the book and decided to use it  but changed floating to spinning. I thought spinning made a bit more sense with this body of work, I was thinking about the Earth spinning relentlessly round its own axis and then us circling the sun and all the toys and games we have invented that mirror that action from the spinning top to the helter skelter and big wheel.Raft of the Seducer - Oil & Gloss on LinenCan you tell me a little bit about how you come up with names for your pictures? Do you paint with certain titles in mind or are they irrelevant?I think with the titles there is another chance to explain your ideas with words or confuse people even more whatever the case may be. Even though the titles aren’t in my mind when painting so much other stuff goes through me that it would seem a shame to call them “untitled”.  Playground of the Western World is one of my titles, obviously a take on the title Playboy of the Western World, a play by J M Synge. I would be lying if I said my painting had a link to the play but the working title for that painting was “the playground” and it came into my head the day I was thinking of the titles, it seemed to fit with what I wanted to say in the paintings in a more literal sense rather than in reference to the play. Other paintings use sayings like Eye of the Storm  - hinting at trouble beneath a calm exterior.Raft of the Seducer is a take on Raft of the Medusa, I’m not trying to align my painting with Gericault, but when I was painting I did think of the buoy that the girl floats on as a raft and I liked that association in my mind, rafts seem primitive and feature often in films, stories, myths as a possible salvation or bridge from wilderness to civilization. Seducer has the same amount of syllables as Medusa so the sound fit quite nicely.  You can read a lot into it or nothing at all the same as with the pictures, I allow myself to make associations visual and lingual.  Despite their bright colours and attractive subjects, your paintings seem to have dystopian undertones - is the world you depict in your paintings a happy one?For me, in the paintings there is a sense of celebration but also a feeling of foreboding. Not quite sure if this is heaven or a lovely moment just before or after the fall but the rules have changed. I hope there is the possibility of redemption, I wouldn’t say they are either happy or sad. Bloom & Bounty - Oil & Gloss on AluminiumYou seem to prefer painting on mediums like aluminium and linen instead of canvas. Why is this?Linen is very similar to canvas but a nicer colour, I eat brown bread so I thought it would be nice to go for the wholemeal version of canvas. The aluminum is something I was doing when I did a lot of industrial landscapes and I thought it suited the subject matter, also it was a nice contrast to my intimate style of painting and I got used to it and have continued. Compared to your last Stolen Space show, the natural world has been given greater prominence this time out, but it’s still vying with the urban world, almost like the two are fighting for control. Do you ever feel like you want to explore just one or the other?I did feel like I had done the industrial landscape thing but I still wanted there to be an urban backdrop to the figures and animals in these paintings, for the combination of imagery to be unexpected and surprising and to reveal something about the gulf between the way we live and dream about living.The people in your paintings remind me of another time and another style…romantic and nostalgic like a Scott-Fitzgerald novel. Whom did you model the subjects after and what was the source of this inspiration?The Great Gatsby is etched into my memory from my Leaving Cert days, but not something I had before thought of in connection with my work. Now you say it I can see the similarities, the characters seem to languish in a forgotten dream world of innocence, excess and desire haunted only by the possibility or knowledge that their dream will fragment.  For this exhibition I used figures taken from travel magazines and adds. I think it is those same qualities of impermanence, an innocence steeped in glamour that attracted me, its the contrast between an escapist fantasy and an urban reality that I find interesting. In a lot of the work, we see the people’s backs and not their fronts, is there a reason for this?I think of the figures as a tool for understanding the landscape, so we can see it through their eyes, if you look at Casper David Friedrich, he did that a lot. We become a second viewer, almost God like, looking down on or into the presented world  (like the big eyes in Great Gatsby).There is, for me, a collage element to the work. Would you agree? If so, where are you pulling things from?Yes I think of them as painted collages. I get the images from everywhere, my own photos, Google images, magazines, newspapers. I try to use images that are throw away and don’t really belong to anybody else in a artistic way. I like the vibe when I look at the work. It feels warm and nostalgic but also temporary, like a summer fling. Is there anything you can relate this to? Is this something related to how you were feeling when you painted them or is it something about you more generally? Do you have any negative emotions in any of your work?I like to flirt with the possibility of danger or destruction in my work, building sites, abandoned cities, packs of wolves, herds of wild beasts but, however or whatever I paint, it always seems to come out soft and dreamy.Nature’s First Lady - Oil & Gloss on AliminiumDo you ever get the equivalent of writer’s block (something which I was born with)? How do you get passed it?I get anxiety all the time, at the end when I look at my paintings I am always surprised that they seem to have escaped from that feeling that I have so much when working. I try to be distant from my work and make the right decisions, at the end it is hard, at the moment I am tired after this exhibition but still I am looking forward to starting new work, it’s a paradox. There is always hope that the next thing I do will be better, one day if I keep practicing I might do something really good -  thats what drives me.  How do you know when you’re done with a painting? What do you look for to say - “voila! c’est fini!”? I think of it like a conversation, every day you look at a painting it says something,  one day you look at it and it is silent  - and voila you start speaking to yourself in French.  Do you think about your paintings when they’re gone?Only as a way to help what I’m working on, how did I figure it out the last time and I look at photos to try to remember, mostly I am only interested in whatever I am working on at that time.
Originally posted in richandcreamy.org, 2008.

Here’s a Q&A I did with Chloe Early around the time of her most recent solo show in London in late 2008. Chloe’s next show, Chasing Castles, with Conor Harrington opens in Los Angeles in April, so hopefully there’ll be more pics, questions and cups of tea (roobois - so Dalston) to come. Pictured above are details from Bloom & Bounty and Foreign Correspondent.


The Eye of the Storm - Oil & Gloss on Aluminium

Chloe Early’s second solo show at The Stolen Space Gallery, Ladies and Gentlemen we are Spinning in Space, has just finished up. We asked Chloe about her new paintings, their connections with the Great Gatsby and speaking to yourself in French.

Let’s start at the top, or the title, where does the name “Ladies and Gentlemen…” come from?
The title came from an article I read last year about the band Spiritualized, some years ago they had an album called Ladies and Gentlemen we are Floating in Space and they had taken the title from a line in the book Sophie’s World.

"Only philosophers embark on this perilous expedition to the outermost reaches of language and existence. Some of them fall off, but others cling on desperately and yell at the people nestling deep in the snug softness, stuffing themselves with delicious food and drink. ‘Ladies and Gentlemen,’ they yell, ‘we are floating in space!’ But none of the people down there care."


I liked both the title and the context from the book and decided to use it  but changed floating to spinning. I thought spinning made a bit more sense with this body of work, I was thinking about the Earth spinning relentlessly round its own axis and then us circling the sun and all the toys and games we have invented that mirror that action from the spinning top to the helter skelter and big wheel.


Raft of the Seducer - Oil & Gloss on Linen

Can you tell me a little bit about how you come up with names for your pictures? Do you paint with certain titles in mind or are they irrelevant?

I think with the titles there is another chance to explain your ideas with words or confuse people even more whatever the case may be. Even though the titles aren’t in my mind when painting so much other stuff goes through me that it would seem a shame to call them “untitled”. 

Playground of the Western World is one of my titles, obviously a take on the title Playboy of the Western World, a play by J M Synge. I would be lying if I said my painting had a link to the play but the working title for that painting was “the playground” and it came into my head the day I was thinking of the titles, it seemed to fit with what I wanted to say in the paintings in a more literal sense rather than in reference to the play. Other paintings use sayings like Eye of the Storm  - hinting at trouble beneath a calm exterior.

Raft of the Seducer is a take on Raft of the Medusa, I’m not trying to align my painting with Gericault, but when I was painting I did think of the buoy that the girl floats on as a raft and I liked that association in my mind, rafts seem primitive and feature often in films, stories, myths as a possible salvation or bridge from wilderness to civilization. Seducer has the same amount of syllables as Medusa so the sound fit quite nicely.  You can read a lot into it or nothing at all the same as with the pictures, I allow myself to make associations visual and lingual. 

Despite their bright colours and attractive subjects, your paintings seem to have dystopian undertones - is the world you depict in your paintings a happy one?
For me, in the paintings there is a sense of celebration but also a feeling of foreboding. Not quite sure if this is heaven or a lovely moment just before or after the fall but the rules have changed. I hope there is the possibility of redemption, I wouldn’t say they are either happy or sad.


Bloom & Bounty - Oil & Gloss on Aluminium

You seem to prefer painting on mediums like aluminium and linen instead of canvas. Why is this?
Linen is very similar to canvas but a nicer colour, I eat brown bread so I thought it would be nice to go for the wholemeal version of canvas. The aluminum is something I was doing when I did a lot of industrial landscapes and I thought it suited the subject matter, also it was a nice contrast to my intimate style of painting and I got used to it and have continued.

Compared to your last Stolen Space show, the natural world has been given greater prominence this time out, but it’s still vying with the urban world, almost like the two are fighting for control. Do you ever feel like you want to explore just one or the other?
I did feel like I had done the industrial landscape thing but I still wanted there to be an urban backdrop to the figures and animals in these paintings, for the combination of imagery to be unexpected and surprising and to reveal something about the gulf between the way we live and dream about living.

The people in your paintings remind me of another time and another style…romantic and nostalgic like a Scott-Fitzgerald novel. Whom did you model the subjects after and what was the source of this inspiration?
The Great Gatsby is etched into my memory from my Leaving Cert days, but not something I had before thought of in connection with my work. Now you say it I can see the similarities, the characters seem to languish in a forgotten dream world of innocence, excess and desire haunted only by the possibility or knowledge that their dream will fragment. 

For this exhibition I used figures taken from travel magazines and adds. I think it is those same qualities of impermanence, an innocence steeped in glamour that attracted me, its the contrast between an escapist fantasy and an urban reality that I find interesting.

In a lot of the work, we see the people’s backs and not their fronts, is there a reason for this?
I think of the figures as a tool for understanding the landscape, so we can see it through their eyes, if you look at Casper David Friedrich, he did that a lot. We become a second viewer, almost God like, looking down on or into the presented world  (like the big eyes in Great Gatsby).

There is, for me, a collage element to the work. Would you agree? If so, where are you pulling things from?
Yes I think of them as painted collages. I get the images from everywhere, my own photos, Google images, magazines, newspapers. I try to use images that are throw away and don’t really belong to anybody else in a artistic way.

I like the vibe when I look at the work. It feels warm and nostalgic but also temporary, like a summer fling. Is there anything you can relate this to? Is this something related to how you were feeling when you painted them or is it something about you more generally? Do you have any negative emotions in any of your work?
I like to flirt with the possibility of danger or destruction in my work, building sites, abandoned cities, packs of wolves, herds of wild beasts but, however or whatever I paint, it always seems to come out soft and dreamy.


Nature’s First Lady - Oil & Gloss on Aliminium

Do you ever get the equivalent of writer’s block (something which I was born with)? How do you get passed it?
I get anxiety all the time, at the end when I look at my paintings I am always surprised that they seem to have escaped from that feeling that I have so much when working. I try to be distant from my work and make the right decisions, at the end it is hard, at the moment I am tired after this exhibition but still I am looking forward to starting new work, it’s a paradox. There is always hope that the next thing I do will be better, one day if I keep practicing I might do something really good -  thats what drives me.

How do you know when you’re done with a painting? What do you look for to say - “voila! c’est fini!”?

I think of it like a conversation, every day you look at a painting it says something,  one day you look at it and it is silent  - and voila you start speaking to yourself in French.

Do you think about your paintings when they’re gone?

Only as a way to help what I’m working on, how did I figure it out the last time and I look at photos to try to remember, mostly I am only interested in whatever I am working on at that time.

Originally posted in richandcreamy.org, 2008.

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Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh