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about out of sight

A site of original and unoriginal content meant to entertain and inform. Out of Sight is edited by JJ O'Donoghue and William Hilderbrandt.

more about out of sight

If this site had to be summed up in one word and a preceding parenthetical phrase, then it would be (hopefully) entertaining. Think of it as an archive of some of the most interesting articles, videos, photography, and miscellany that JJ and William find online.

Presently the two have hopes of expanding the site to include some of their own work, and when they do just watch the hilarity ensue.

In the meantime please leave comments on posts - whether you like or dislike - and make suggestions as to what you want to see more of. For some of you it's more tits and ass, for others you prefer men with beards, and for one of you (you know who I am talking about) it's all about jam.

one more thing on out of sight

Out of sight is Will and JJ's attempt to get noticed and invited on daytime TV or any Fox TV show. Before out of sight, there was rich and creamy, a hugely popular blog for spammers who wanted to sell us penis enhancing products. They were wasting their time.

But to stick to the augmentation analogy, out of sight at its best is a brain enhancing website. That's a radical statement guys.

What you'll find on the site is a ménage à trois of humour, skepticism, intelligence and titilation. We really enjoy comments and recommendations and we hope to build up a community of followers so that we then add a subscription wall and take on the Financial Times or Playboy. Or just get jobs with them.

who is this stud william?

William lives in Paris. At the start of 2009 he left London and all his friends and his bad job to come to France, where he hardly speaks the language, to be with his girlfriend. Officially he is very happy to finally be living with her but occasionally he does get nostalgic for London.

He grew up in the US - Oklahoma (please do not hum the musical!) - and studied philosophy before going to London for a Master's in journalism. His work has not been published by the best in the industry, such as The New York Times, The Atlantic Monthly, The Economist, Mother Jones, McSweeney's, and many, many more.

Currently he is freelancing at radio and TV gigs, slowly acquiring technical skills he hopes he can eventually use to make documentary and feature films that one day will not be produced by some of the world's best film studios.

who is this wise guy jj?

Quite early on in life JJ discovered that he was a fabricator. In 2006 his mum and dad invited him to leave their home in Cork, Ireland and head for London, where he now resides, to shake up the city. He cycles hard, drinks hard and blogs harder. You get the picture.

Currently he's alive, and, like most people his age he's 29. He longs for the day Japan get's moved right next to Ireland, and that Cork wins the world series in hurling. More than anything else he want's a book deal. Failing that a decent sandwich with French mustard, mayonnaise and Ballymaloe relish in it.

17 August 09
I was in Copenhagen on my nearly annual visit to what must be one of my favourite cities. What’s not to like, fine women, beer, bicycles - sometimes all together - and hills are outlawed.
On this trip I got a tour of the newly opened concert hall at the DR HQ, the Danish national broadcaster. It was designed by Jean Nouvel and doesn’t look like much from the outside - at night it’s a just a blue coloured cube. But, holy kebabs, on the inside it has to be the most impressive concert hall I have ever been in.
It seats 1,800 but it actually felt like it holds less. And the acoustics - it was like being in the womb of a musical beast - if that analogy works. More pics here.

I was in Copenhagen on my nearly annual visit to what must be one of my favourite cities. What’s not to like, fine women, beer, bicycles - sometimes all together - and hills are outlawed.

On this trip I got a tour of the newly opened concert hall at the DR HQ, the Danish national broadcaster. It was designed by Jean Nouvel and doesn’t look like much from the outside - at night it’s a just a blue coloured cube. But, holy kebabs, on the inside it has to be the most impressive concert hall I have ever been in.

It seats 1,800 but it actually felt like it holds less. And the acoustics - it was like being in the womb of a musical beast - if that analogy works. More pics here.

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18 June 09
The Architects Journal has published its top ten favourite Star Wars structures. I am not much of a SW nut, but the Death Star, in top place, and Corsucant, pictured above are highly imaginative mega-structures. Here’s what the panel had to say about planet Corsucant:

“Like adding New York to Kuala Lumpur and Hong Kong, then squaring the result. The capital of the Old Republic takes urban sprawl to the extreme and realises the vision of Greek City planner Constantinos Doxiadis of an ecumeonpolis: a single city that covers the whole of a planet. The ‘New Architecture’ style common to the Senate Area of Coruscant is characterised by Manhattan-like skyscrapers nestled among blade-thin obelisks that resemble the soaring minarets of Cairo”.

The Architects Journal has published its top ten favourite Star Wars structures. I am not much of a SW nut, but the Death Star, in top place, and Corsucant, pictured above are highly imaginative mega-structures. Here’s what the panel had to say about planet Corsucant:

Like adding New York to Kuala Lumpur and Hong Kong, then squaring the result. The capital of the Old Republic takes urban sprawl to the extreme and realises the vision of Greek City planner Constantinos Doxiadis of an ecumeonpolis: a single city that covers the whole of a planet. The ‘New Architecture’ style common to the Senate Area of Coruscant is characterised by Manhattan-like skyscrapers nestled among blade-thin obelisks that resemble the soaring minarets of Cairo”.

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10 June 09
The future of farming is… vertical, as imagined by Vincent Callebut Architects. Don’t know why we need to go up, when there’s plenty of land about. Nonetheless it’s interesting to look at. More pics of the ‘dragonfly farm’ over at designboom.

The future of farming is… vertical, as imagined by Vincent Callebut Architects. Don’t know why we need to go up, when there’s plenty of land about. Nonetheless it’s interesting to look at. More pics of the ‘dragonfly farm’ over at designboom.

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31 March 09
Photographer Michael Wolf’s latest work gets up close and intimate with the residential and industrial architecture of Hong Kong, one of the most densely populated cities on earth.
Via gkojaxlabo:
click image to continue

Photographer Michael Wolf’s latest work gets up close and intimate with the residential and industrial architecture of Hong Kong, one of the most densely populated cities on earth.

Via gkojaxlabo:

click image to continue

Reblogged: kagurazakaundergroundresistance

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30 March 09

Reblogged: kagurazakaundergroundresistance

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25 March 09

Arakawa and Madeline Gins are a couple whose architectural work, based loosely on transhumanism, led one Guggenheim curator to call it a “milestone in the history of conceptual art”. The couple’s practice and future though is in jeopardy as they invested their entire life savings into Bernie Madoff’s infamous ponzi scheme. But what is so interesting about their work? To be brief: achieving everlasting life through an uncomfortable or challenging living space. Says The Wall Street Journal:

They build buildings with no doors inside. They place rooms far apart. They put windows near the ceiling or near the floor. Between rooms are sloping, bumpy moonscape-like floors designed to throw occupants off balance. These features, they argue, stimulate the body and mind, thus prolonging life.
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24 March 09
This tea-house tree house was contructed on two chessnut tress in Nagano Prefecture, Japan. It was designed by Japanese architect Terunobu Fujimori. To me it could be something out of Hayo Miyazaki film. More images on Dezeen. [Thanks, Anthony]

This tea-house tree house was contructed on two chessnut tress in Nagano Prefecture, Japan. It was designed by Japanese architect Terunobu Fujimori. To me it could be something out of Hayo Miyazaki film. More images on Dezeen. [Thanks, Anthony]

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18 March 09
Planners in Paris have unveiled radical proposals for the French capital. One proposal is to build an elevated maglev train that would run above the Paris périphérique. As the NYTimes said, this is a braizen plan, espacially in the conetxt of the current economic climate. Although there’s no mention of funding, such an overhaul of Paris is truly exciting. Here’s two of the propsoals from the Times:

Among the most audacious is Mr de Portzamparc’s plan, which proposes demolishing both the Gare du Nord and the Gare de l’Est and replacing them with a single massive European train station just outside the city center. The station would link to the Eurostar train lines to London and Brussels, as well as to a new elevated maglev train that would run above the périphérique. It would also anchor a towering new global business district, a rival to La Défense.


Mr Rogers’s plan is equally ambitious. Noting that the tracks that connect to the city’s main train stations cut Paris into wedges, like slices of a pie, he proposes burying them all underground. A vast system of public parks would be draped over these new underground tracks, connecting poor and middle-class neighborhoods. A new Métro line would ring the outer city; more trains would tie the system back to the historic center.

Planners in Paris have unveiled radical proposals for the French capital. One proposal is to build an elevated maglev train that would run above the Paris périphérique. As the NYTimes said, this is a braizen plan, espacially in the conetxt of the current economic climate. Although there’s no mention of funding, such an overhaul of Paris is truly exciting. Here’s two of the propsoals from the Times:

Among the most audacious is Mr de Portzamparc’s plan, which proposes demolishing both the Gare du Nord and the Gare de l’Est and replacing them with a single massive European train station just outside the city center. The station would link to the Eurostar train lines to London and Brussels, as well as to a new elevated maglev train that would run above the périphérique. It would also anchor a towering new global business district, a rival to La Défense.

Mr Rogers’s plan is equally ambitious. Noting that the tracks that connect to the city’s main train stations cut Paris into wedges, like slices of a pie, he proposes burying them all underground. A vast system of public parks would be draped over these new underground tracks, connecting poor and middle-class neighborhoods. A new Métro line would ring the outer city; more trains would tie the system back to the historic center.

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15 March 09

It’s hard to appreciate how small the space this Tokyo office/house was built in. Even this nine-minute video fails to fully capture how an alleyway became home to a four floor working and living space, still it’s worth a look at.

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Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh