Home | Archive | Random | RSS

about out of sight

A site of original and unoriginal content meant to entertain and inform. Out of Sight is edited by JJ O'Donoghue and William Hilderbrandt.

more about out of sight

If this site had to be summed up in one word and a preceding parenthetical phrase, then it would be (hopefully) entertaining. Think of it as an archive of some of the most interesting articles, videos, photography, and miscellany that JJ and William find online.

Presently the two have hopes of expanding the site to include some of their own work, and when they do just watch the hilarity ensue.

In the meantime please leave comments on posts - whether you like or dislike - and make suggestions as to what you want to see more of. For some of you it's more tits and ass, for others you prefer men with beards, and for one of you (you know who I am talking about) it's all about jam.

one more thing on out of sight

Out of sight is Will and JJ's attempt to get noticed and invited on daytime TV or any Fox TV show. Before out of sight, there was rich and creamy, a hugely popular blog for spammers who wanted to sell us penis enhancing products. They were wasting their time.

But to stick to the augmentation analogy, out of sight at its best is a brain enhancing website. That's a radical statement guys.

What you'll find on the site is a ménage à trois of humour, skepticism, intelligence and titilation. We really enjoy comments and recommendations and we hope to build up a community of followers so that we then add a subscription wall and take on the Financial Times or Playboy. Or just get jobs with them.

who is this stud william?

William lives in Paris. At the start of 2009 he left London and all his friends and his bad job to come to France, where he hardly speaks the language, to be with his girlfriend. Officially he is very happy to finally be living with her but occasionally he does get nostalgic for London.

He grew up in the US - Oklahoma (please do not hum the musical!) - and studied philosophy before going to London for a Master's in journalism. His work has not been published by the best in the industry, such as The New York Times, The Atlantic Monthly, The Economist, Mother Jones, McSweeney's, and many, many more.

Currently he is freelancing at radio and TV gigs, slowly acquiring technical skills he hopes he can eventually use to make documentary and feature films that one day will not be produced by some of the world's best film studios.

who is this wise guy jj?

Quite early on in life JJ discovered that he was a fabricator. In 2006 his mum and dad invited him to leave their home in Cork, Ireland and head for London, where he now resides, to shake up the city. He cycles hard, drinks hard and blogs harder. You get the picture.

Currently he's alive, and, like most people his age he's 29. He longs for the day Japan get's moved right next to Ireland, and that Cork wins the world series in hurling. More than anything else he want's a book deal. Failing that a decent sandwich with French mustard, mayonnaise and Ballymaloe relish in it.

13 August 09

as a matter of fact #16

The amount of money Latin American expatriates send home is expected to drop by 11%, from $69 billion to $62 billion this year according to the Inter-American Development Bank. The Wall Street Journal

Three per cent of the school-age population in the U.S., roughly 1.5 million students, are home-schooled. This figure has doubled in the last decade according to the Department of Education. The Economist

Figures produced by Cancer Research UK show that since the mid-1990s, rates of oral cancers have gone up by 28% for men in their forties and 24% for women. Greater alcohol consumption is largely to blame. BBC News

U.S. births fell by 2% in 2008, the first full year of the recession, marking the first annual decline in births since the start of the decade and ending an American baby boomlet. USA Today

A survey by UK Music and the University of Hertfordshire found that amongst 14-24 year olds stored on average about 8,000 tracks - about 17 days worth of music - on their computers.

US banks stand to collect a record $38.5bn in fees for customer overdrafts this year. Pricks - the banks that is. FT.com

Comments (View)
10 August 09

Technology killed the family

The New York Times has a feature on the incursion of technology into the American family. The Gude family from Michigan prefer text messaging over talking:

"The Gudes’ sons sleep with their phones next to their beds, so they start the day with text messages in place of alarm clocks. Mr. Gude, an instructor at Michigan State University, sends texts to his two sons to wake up.

We use texting as an in-house intercom,” he said. “I could just walk upstairs, but they always answer their texts.”

Gone are the days when you’d be fighting for the bathroom, nowadays it’s the computer.

Web metric companies say internet traffic surges in the morning as families all over the country wake up and sleep walk to their computers to check their multiple email and social-networking accounts.

Comments (View)
30 July 09
Personal Urns combine art and technology to create a family heirloom that will be cherished for generations.
Isn’t this just a really tacky idea? It’s the type of thing that, despite being ugly and completely ridiculous, could still find footing to take off in the US. Doesn’t this one look like a very poor Hollywood designer’s pitch for the Red Dragon scene where Anthony Hopkins dines on a man’s brains?

Personal Urns combine art and technology to create a family heirloom that will be cherished for generations.

Isn’t this just a really tacky idea? It’s the type of thing that, despite being ugly and completely ridiculous, could still find footing to take off in the US. Doesn’t this one look like a very poor Hollywood designer’s pitch for the Red Dragon scene where Anthony Hopkins dines on a man’s brains?

Comments (View)
28 July 09

I was listening to an old Real Time with Bill Maher podcast and couldn’t stop squealing with laughter when they compared the love notes of Mark Sanford and Mark Foley. A brief recap in case you don’t recall. Sanford (governor of South Carolina) was missing for a full week in June and neither his wife or law enforcement could track him down. Turns out he was having a steamy affair in Argentina with a journalist. As for Foley, in 2006 he was sending downright dirty emails to teenage boys who had interned for him as congressional pages.

Comments (View)
Posted: 9:56 AM

Birthers on the hill. Huffington Post chases down congressmen to ask about Obama’s citizenship.

Comments (View)
Posted: 9:13 AM

This could have been a bit more interesting had they developed their questioning. Nonetheless, I had no idea what a birther was until I watched this video and I certainly wouldn’t have thought it had anything to do with Barack Obama.

Comments (View)
27 July 09
Sarah Palin stepped down yesterday and, even though I covered this, I already forgot the name of the man replacing her as the new governor of Alaska. Anyway, her speech provided no concrete idea of what she’ll do next - I think she’d be ripe for joining The View, or having her own talk show that focuses more on lifestyle, fashion, and pseudo-populist commentary.
So, in commemoration of her dull and folksy speech yesterday, the above image is Palin’s original speech announcing her resignation on July 3. Vanity Fair decided to have a run at the text and see how much work it would need before it was “publishable”. Speech-writers in Wasilla aren’t the same grade as their counterparts in Washington.
The red is courtesy of Vanity Fair's executive literary editor, the blue is from the copy editors, and all green is from the research department.

Sarah Palin stepped down yesterday and, even though I covered this, I already forgot the name of the man replacing her as the new governor of Alaska. Anyway, her speech provided no concrete idea of what she’ll do next - I think she’d be ripe for joining The View, or having her own talk show that focuses more on lifestyle, fashion, and pseudo-populist commentary.

So, in commemoration of her dull and folksy speech yesterday, the above image is Palin’s original speech announcing her resignation on July 3. Vanity Fair decided to have a run at the text and see how much work it would need before it was “publishable”. Speech-writers in Wasilla aren’t the same grade as their counterparts in Washington.

The red is courtesy of Vanity Fair's executive literary editor, the blue is from the copy editors, and all green is from the research department.

Comments (View)
1 July 09
Sometimes I don’t miss home. Oklahoma State Representative Sally Kern has said that America’s economic woes are down to its populace’s general moral debauchery. That’s right, all this porn, sex, divorce, and abortion means Wall Street has taken Main Street out for an all-nighter in Sin City. Previously, Kern has compared homosexuality to toe cancer. Needless to say, Kern is a Republican and said of this economic/moral whirlpool:
“Be it resolved that we, the undersigned, humbly call upon Holy God, our Creator, Sustainer, and Redeemer, to have mercy on this nation, to stay His hand of judgment, and grant a national awakening of righteousness and Christian renewal as we repent of our great sin.”

Sometimes I don’t miss home. Oklahoma State Representative Sally Kern has said that America’s economic woes are down to its populace’s general moral debauchery. That’s right, all this porn, sex, divorce, and abortion means Wall Street has taken Main Street out for an all-nighter in Sin City. Previously, Kern has compared homosexuality to toe cancer. Needless to say, Kern is a Republican and said of this economic/moral whirlpool:

“Be it resolved that we, the undersigned, humbly call upon Holy God, our Creator, Sustainer, and Redeemer, to have mercy on this nation, to stay His hand of judgment, and grant a national awakening of righteousness and Christian renewal as we repent of our great sin.”
Comments (View)
Posted: 9:05 AM
Comments (View)
19 June 09
The US Senate has unanimously passed a bill that is a sort of formal apology for the country’s history of slavery and racial segregation. It is a symbolic gesture and explicitly says it does not include reparations. The Senate has done this kind of thing before - for instance with the Japanese internment camps, another fascinating but sad chapter in US history.
In the 1800s various politicians described slavery as a necessary evil, including Thomas Jefferson - the country’s third president and the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (now more famous for lousy Nicolas Cage films). Jefferson wrote in a letter in 1820: “We have the wolf by the ear, and we can neither hold him, nor safely let him go. Justice is in one scale, and self-preservation in the other.”
The 1860 census reveals the slave population in each of the states, which existed at the time. You’d be feeling pretty lonely in Kansas. Always important reminder, slavery was not just black. America would shackle and whip nearly anyone it could get its hands on.

The US Senate has unanimously passed a bill that is a sort of formal apology for the country’s history of slavery and racial segregation. It is a symbolic gesture and explicitly says it does not include reparations. The Senate has done this kind of thing before - for instance with the Japanese internment camps, another fascinating but sad chapter in US history.

In the 1800s various politicians described slavery as a necessary evil, including Thomas Jefferson - the country’s third president and the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (now more famous for lousy Nicolas Cage films). Jefferson wrote in a letter in 1820: “We have the wolf by the ear, and we can neither hold him, nor safely let him go. Justice is in one scale, and self-preservation in the other.”

The 1860 census reveals the slave population in each of the states, which existed at the time. You’d be feeling pretty lonely in Kansas. Always important reminder, slavery was not just black. America would shackle and whip nearly anyone it could get its hands on.

Comments (View)
17 June 09
Hearty goodness from The Economist - Arming up - The world’s biggest military spenders by population:
GLOBAL military expenditure rose by 4% in 2008 to a record $1.46 trillion, according to a new report by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. Israel spends most on defence relative to its population, shelling out over $2,300 a person, over $300 more than America. Small and rich countries, and notably Gulf states, feature prominently by this measure. Saudi Arabia ranks ninth in absolute spending, but sixth by population. China has increased spending by 10% to $85 billion to become the world’s second largest spender. But it is still dwarfed by America, whose outlay of $607 billion is higher than that of the next 14 biggest spenders combined.

(link)

Hearty goodness from The Economist - Arming up - The world’s biggest military spenders by population:

GLOBAL military expenditure rose by 4% in 2008 to a record $1.46 trillion, according to a new report by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. Israel spends most on defence relative to its population, shelling out over $2,300 a person, over $300 more than America. Small and rich countries, and notably Gulf states, feature prominently by this measure. Saudi Arabia ranks ninth in absolute spending, but sixth by population. China has increased spending by 10% to $85 billion to become the world’s second largest spender. But it is still dwarfed by America, whose outlay of $607 billion is higher than that of the next 14 biggest spenders combined.

(link)
Comments (View)
5 June 09

what obama’s cairo speech means

I haven’t read through Obama’s entire Cairo speech yet, but Robert Kaplan, writing in The Atlantic, has given it an unreserved thumbs up.

"He did all this with a polished delivery – pronouncing correctly all Arabic and other foreign names – and without generally apologizing for America. He said America’s commitment to Afghanistan will not falter; that Iraq was better off without Saddam Hussein; and that America’s bond with Israel is unbreakable. He said, in an obvious reference to the rants of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, that Holocaust denial and the promotion of stereotypes and anti-Semitism are wrong. Indeed, he noted that the important question for Iran is not what it is against, but what kind of a future it wants to build. By making America’s historical vision of a future city on a hill synonymous with that of his young Muslim audience, he instantly put Iran on the defensive."

Comments (View)
26 May 09
Comments (View)
25 May 09

Once the debate over what is and is not torture - such as waterboarding - started heating up, it was only a matter of time until volunteers stepped forward to help settle the matter. For some reason, many of the people who have suffered waterboarding in real life - for instance the outspoken and fantastic Jesse Ventura (here busting Sean Hannity’s balls) - are not receiving a fair audience. Conservatives dismiss them as liberals endangering the US with their accounts. My hat’s off to these brave (or foolish) lambs: Current’s Kaj Larsen (above), conservative radio host Erich Mancow, and obnoxiously intelligent Christopher Hitchens.

Comments (View)
Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh