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about out of sight

A site of original and unoriginal content meant to entertain and inform. Out of Sight is edited by JJ O'Donoghue and William Hilderbrandt.

more about out of sight

If this site had to be summed up in one word and a preceding parenthetical phrase, then it would be (hopefully) entertaining. Think of it as an archive of some of the most interesting articles, videos, photography, and miscellany that JJ and William find online.

Presently the two have hopes of expanding the site to include some of their own work, and when they do just watch the hilarity ensue.

In the meantime please leave comments on posts - whether you like or dislike - and make suggestions as to what you want to see more of. For some of you it's more tits and ass, for others you prefer men with beards, and for one of you (you know who I am talking about) it's all about jam.

one more thing on out of sight

Out of sight is Will and JJ's attempt to get noticed and invited on daytime TV or any Fox TV show. Before out of sight, there was rich and creamy, a hugely popular blog for spammers who wanted to sell us penis enhancing products. They were wasting their time.

But to stick to the augmentation analogy, out of sight at its best is a brain enhancing website. That's a radical statement guys.

What you'll find on the site is a ménage à trois of humour, skepticism, intelligence and titilation. We really enjoy comments and recommendations and we hope to build up a community of followers so that we then add a subscription wall and take on the Financial Times or Playboy. Or just get jobs with them.

who is this stud william?

William lives in Paris. At the start of 2009 he left London and all his friends and his bad job to come to France, where he hardly speaks the language, to be with his girlfriend. Officially he is very happy to finally be living with her but occasionally he does get nostalgic for London.

He grew up in the US - Oklahoma (please do not hum the musical!) - and studied philosophy before going to London for a Master's in journalism. His work has not been published by the best in the industry, such as The New York Times, The Atlantic Monthly, The Economist, Mother Jones, McSweeney's, and many, many more.

Currently he is freelancing at radio and TV gigs, slowly acquiring technical skills he hopes he can eventually use to make documentary and feature films that one day will not be produced by some of the world's best film studios.

who is this wise guy jj?

Quite early on in life JJ discovered that he was a fabricator. In 2006 his mum and dad invited him to leave their home in Cork, Ireland and head for London, where he now resides, to shake up the city. He cycles hard, drinks hard and blogs harder. You get the picture.

Currently he's alive, and, like most people his age he's 29. He longs for the day Japan get's moved right next to Ireland, and that Cork wins the world series in hurling. More than anything else he want's a book deal. Failing that a decent sandwich with French mustard, mayonnaise and Ballymaloe relish in it.

19 June 09
The US Senate has unanimously passed a bill that is a sort of formal apology for the country’s history of slavery and racial segregation. It is a symbolic gesture and explicitly says it does not include reparations. The Senate has done this kind of thing before - for instance with the Japanese internment camps, another fascinating but sad chapter in US history.
In the 1800s various politicians described slavery as a necessary evil, including Thomas Jefferson - the country’s third president and the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (now more famous for lousy Nicolas Cage films). Jefferson wrote in a letter in 1820: “We have the wolf by the ear, and we can neither hold him, nor safely let him go. Justice is in one scale, and self-preservation in the other.”
The 1860 census reveals the slave population in each of the states, which existed at the time. You’d be feeling pretty lonely in Kansas. Always important reminder, slavery was not just black. America would shackle and whip nearly anyone it could get its hands on.

The US Senate has unanimously passed a bill that is a sort of formal apology for the country’s history of slavery and racial segregation. It is a symbolic gesture and explicitly says it does not include reparations. The Senate has done this kind of thing before - for instance with the Japanese internment camps, another fascinating but sad chapter in US history.

In the 1800s various politicians described slavery as a necessary evil, including Thomas Jefferson - the country’s third president and the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (now more famous for lousy Nicolas Cage films). Jefferson wrote in a letter in 1820: “We have the wolf by the ear, and we can neither hold him, nor safely let him go. Justice is in one scale, and self-preservation in the other.”

The 1860 census reveals the slave population in each of the states, which existed at the time. You’d be feeling pretty lonely in Kansas. Always important reminder, slavery was not just black. America would shackle and whip nearly anyone it could get its hands on.

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27 April 09

A sweet mix of hip-hop, soul, R&B and reggae from the likes of Baaba Maal, Ladysmith Black Mambazo, Mamady Keita and others.

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27 March 09
I only learned of Liberia’s blackboard blogger, or the analog blogger, a week or two ago but it’s a story worth sharing. Alfred Sirleaf decided a few years ago that he wanted to get information, the news, to people who couldn’t afford newspapers. So he opened up the “Daily Talk”, a hut and a blackboard on the side of a busy road in Monrovia.
He even appeals to the illiterate by using props, such as helmets to denote soldiers or a military. Sirleaf hopes to spread his work around the country so more people have access to information.
The New York Times did a piece on Sirleaf three years ago, as did AfriGadget more recently, and here’s a video about him.

I only learned of Liberia’s blackboard blogger, or the analog blogger, a week or two ago but it’s a story worth sharing. Alfred Sirleaf decided a few years ago that he wanted to get information, the news, to people who couldn’t afford newspapers. So he opened up the “Daily Talk”, a hut and a blackboard on the side of a busy road in Monrovia.

He even appeals to the illiterate by using props, such as helmets to denote soldiers or a military. Sirleaf hopes to spread his work around the country so more people have access to information.

The New York Times did a piece on Sirleaf three years ago, as did AfriGadget more recently, and here’s a video about him.

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4 March 09

Lighting up parts of Africa

Dutch electronics giant Philips is working with a Ghanian organisation to bring artificial light to villages that have no electricity. Philips has developed three LED  lights: a solar-powered lantern, a reading light and a wind-up flashlight. From the New York Times:

As in any non-electrified society, life is defined by the sun; little is accomplished once it sets around 6 p.m. she said on the telephone from her office in Accra. And with children helping out with chores during daytime, it leaves little chance for them to study.
The products work because they all use LEDs; their low power consumption means that the lantern charged during the day will light for seven hours. The flashlight’s bulb will for all practical purposes never burn out, and the reading light’s lower power consumption dramatically reduces the need to change batteries.
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Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh